Angola and an Unforgettable Ride Report

If you’ve ever done any motorcycle touring as a part of your adventures, you will almost certainly be aware of ADVRider.com. It’s a long-standing ride forum, famous for its interesting ride reports. People from all over the world go there to share photos and stories from the remote locations they ride to.



I, myself, am not a motorycle rider. I am merely fascinated by travel, which is why I have this site, but seeing a ride report crossposted on travelblog.org, from advrider.com changed my life forever: it was my original inspiration for travel… Seeing this ride report was the moment I caught the wanderlust bug.

A pack of South Africans/Rhodesians, I’m not sure which, decided to ride across Angola and enter Namibia, getting stuck, having misadventures, and exploring extremely remote and rough terrain.

Their journey starts with an encounter with the Himba people, of which they say:

Himba’s are an amazing race of people who are semi-nomadic cattle barons. They have a very rich culture that is expressed in their dress and customs. They smear themselves head to toe with a red ochre and butterfat mixture. It has a strong alien smell to us but I know that they think we stink just as bad to them. They have a complex and highly ritualized language that would make the French look uncouth. They are polite and friendly and never imposing or aggressive. A bad habit that some of the younger kids have learned on the more well trodden paths is to shout for you to stop to give them sweets. Something that travellers to this part of the world have wrongly encouraged and it has eroded the image of the proud Himba nation a bit. It is better to trade tobacco, sewing needles or flour for photo’s and low value bangles.

It is really bad form to try and trade for their status adornments such as their metal neck/waist bands and shells and the more unique pieces. As they are incredibly polite and sometimes naive, I have seen some 4×4 tourists trade a paltry amount of money for these highly traditional and culturally significant items.

And it proceeds into the desert, where one of the riders’ electrical system fails on their bike. It gets working again, but they have to get it to a town to be repaired!

They eventually end up on the Skeleton Coast! Which is an incredibly isolated region.



The (literal) cliff-hanger comes shortly thereafter. You’ll have to read it yourself and get inspired!

Read more at the original post: https://advrider.com/f/threads/angola-its-not-like-they-said.269251/

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